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Poetry Book Give-Away II: Notes From The Divided Country/ Immortal Sofa

I started reading another Whitman award winner, Suji Kwock Kim this week for my poetry give-away. But sorry people, I'm on page 15 and this is a book I'm going to keep and savor, one of those that specifically talks to you at a moment in your life (I just had a baby, and the first poems of this book talk directly to that experience).

It's a beautiful, soul-wrenching book. Notes from the Divided Country $6 from LSU Press..


So my offering this week is a book of poetry that I reviewed on Hayden Ferry Review's blog from one of our contributors: Immortal Sofa by Maura Stanton.
Warning, it is not a microreview.

Why I think you should spend $2.00 postage on this book:

"God's Ode to Creation," "The Milk of Human Kindness," are great poems.

Here's a sample though of one of my other favorite poems from this collection:

"I close my eyes, trying to conjure the warm
watery planet, sizzling with lightning bolts,
where I darted and turned my somersaults
and then, diving through transparent depths,
inserted myself through the waving seaweed
and came back up, my eye filled with joy."

from "Practicing T'ai Chi Chu'an"



Give this book a new home!

Comments

Gail White said…
I'd be glad to send you $2.00 for the Stanton book if you'll send me your address.
I'd also like to send you one of my own books, if that wouldn't be a burden to you.
Gail White
gailxpoet@cox.net
and
www.gailwhite.org

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